All posts by Julia Selker

BCSE Statement on Senate Introduction of Clean Energy for America Act (April 21, 2021)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 21, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

BCSE Statement on Senate Introduction of Clean Energy for America Act  

Statement from Lisa Jacobson, BCSE President

“The Business Council for Sustainable Energy is pleased to see Senator Wyden, with 24 cosponsors, once again take the lead on clean energy tax policy through the introduction today of the Clean Energy for America Act. The broad scope of eligible technologies makes this legislation especially effective in supporting a diverse and reliable American clean energy industry.  We applaud Senator Wyden for recognizing that clean energy is key to our future prosperity and our nation’s economic recovery.

“Incentives for deployment of many clean energy technologies and infrastructure investments along with tax measures to promote workforce development and domestic manufacturing can help ensure American technology leadership, revitalize our manufacturing centers and create good jobs across the country.

“The BCSE looks forward to reviewing Senator Wyden’s legislation and working with him to ensure long-term stable tax policy will be utilized to meet these objectives and to help the nation build back better. As I wrote in an April 15 op-ed in The Hill, we see the highest impact when tax policy is in sync with industry’s investment and project development cycles. Long-term and durable credits lead to steady growth.”

Download this press release.

Minnesota Energy Factsheet: Majority of Minnesota Electricity Zero-Emission in 2020 (April 15, 2021)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 15, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

Majority of Minnesota Electricity Zero-Emission in 2020

Resilient growth and new milestones show momentum for energy transition

PAUL, MINN. – The 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet, released today, shows that clean energy made huge strides in 2020, despite the uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In 2020, zero-carbon electricity (composed of renewables and nuclear), generated 55 percent of Minnesota’s electricity, up from 48 percent in 2019. For the first time, renewable energy was the biggest source of electricity in Minnesota at 29 percent of total generation. Of 588 megawatts of new generation capacity built in 2020, all of it was wind or solar, marking a new record for Minnesota.

“Last year’s addition of new wind and solar capacity shows how Minnesota’s clean energy transition is happening in real time,” said Gregg Mast, executive director of Clean Energy Economy Minnesota. “With the right policy levers in place, businesses can fully leverage the clean energy transition and ensure that jobs continue to grow and that the economic benefits are extended to everyone who lives here.”

“Years like 2020 remind us why long-term data collection and analysis are critical tools for the clean energy industry,” said Lisa Jacobson, president of the BCSE. “The 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet shows that clean energy has strong momentum that carried the industry through a challenging year, but that progress cannot be taken for granted. For the clean energy sector to continue expanding its workforce and reducing emissions, it must be central in economic stimulus and recovery policy.”

The Factsheet is a companion to the 2021 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook, which outlines key trends influencing national and state investment and economics, energy supply, and energy demand. Both resources are commissioned by the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE), with research by BloombergNEF.

“The data in this year’s Minnesota Energy Factsheet shows very clearly how the right policy paired with ideal market conditions can create swift, positive changes in our energy sector,” said Aditya Ranade, Deputy Commissioner of the Division of Energy Resources at the Minnesota Department of Commerce. “Since 2005, carbon emissions from the state’s power sector are down by more than 30%. We will continue to work in collaboration across the state to continue this progress.”

“From our perspective – partnering with cities and campuses to decrease their carbon emissions is not only important work – it’s work that bolsters economic growth in those communities,” said Ken Smith, President and CEO of Ever-Green Energy. “Minnesota is showing how innovative solutions to incorporate renewable energy and decrease emissions are helping us transition to a clean energy economy. And we’re doing it in a way that is strengthening our economy and creating jobs along the way.”

Highlights from this year’s Minnesota Energy Factsheet include:

  • More than HALF of Minnesota’s power came from zero-carbon sources in 2020. Meanwhile, coal’s contribution slipped from 30 percent in 2019 to 25 percent in 2020.
  • RENEWABLE GENERATION rose from 18 percent of generation in 2011 to 29 percent in 2020, becoming the #1 source of electricity in Minnesota last year.
  • 82% of all NEW POWER-GENERATING CAPACITY built in Minnesota in the last decade came from RENEWABLE ENERGY, adding 3.6 GW.
  • POWER SECTOR EMISSIONS in Minnesota fell nearly 17 percent in 2020 alone. Since 2011, emissions are down 40 percent.
  • Major Minnesota-based corporations have increased their efforts to procure renewable energy. 3M Co., Cargill Inc., Ecolab Inc., Target Corp., and General Mills between them have now signed agreements to power their operations with either wind or solar energy from projects representing over 1.3 GIGAWATTS OF CAPACITY.
  • Excluding the production tax credit (PTC), new wind builds are the CHEAPEST FORM of new electricity generation in the state. With the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), new solar builds are competitive with new combined-cycle natural gas plant builds on a $/MWh basis in Minnesota.
  • ELECTRIC VEHICLE sales in Minnesota are accelerating as battery prices have fallen. From 2016 to 2020 annual registrations of battery electric vehicles increased 535% to 3,800 units. Annual plug-in hybrid electric vehicle registrations rose 150% to 2,000 units.
  • The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) ranked MINNESOTA 9th out of all 50 states for its overall energy efficiency programs (the HIGHEST RANKING in the Midwest).

Download the 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet today at https://www.bcse.org/factbook/#mn.

Download this press release.

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About Clean Energy Economy Minnesota (CEEM): CEEM is an industry-led 501(c)(3) nonprofit representing the business voice for clean energy in Minnesota. CEEM provides a unified voice for clean energy business across the state. Our mission is to provide educational leadership, collaboration, and policy analysis that accelerates clean energy market growth and smart energy policies. Learn more at cleanenergyeconomymn.org.

About the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE): BCSE is a trade association representing the energy efficiency, natural gas, and renewable energy sectors. It advocates for policies at the state, federal, and international level that promote the deployment of the full portfolio of commercially available clean energy products, technologies and services. Learn more at bcse.org.

About BloombergNEF: BloombergNEF is a leading provider of primary research on clean energy, advanced transport, digital industry, innovative materials, and commodities.  With a team of experts spread across six continents, BloombergNEF leverages the world’s most sophisticated data sets to create clear perspectives and in-depth forecasts that frame the financial, economic and policy implications of industry-transforming trends and technologies.  Available online, on mobile and on the Terminal, BloombergNEF is powered by Bloomberg’s global network of 19,000 employees in 176 locations, reporting 5,000 news stories a day. Learn more at about.bnef.com.

Media Advisory for Briefing on April 15: 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet Release (April 13, 2021)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 13, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

Briefing on April 15: 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet Release

Energy Data Report Chronicles Pandemic Year

PAUL, MINN. – The 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet, which collects data on the state’s clean energy economy, will be released on April 15. The clean energy industry’s performance in 2020 has implications for state clean energy goals, as well as policy options to support economic recovery.

Members of the media who would like to preview the 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet and press release may request embargoed copies from Amelia Cerling Hennes ([email protected]) or Julia Selker ([email protected]).

An expert panel will present on the findings and take questions at 12 pm CDT on April 15. Registration is open here.

Agenda

Opening Remarks

  • Lisa Jacobson, President, Business Council for Sustainable Energy

Overview of 2021 Minnesota Energy Factsheet

  • Melina Bartels, Associate, BloombergNEF

Expert Panel Discussion on Clean Energy Opportunities

Closing Remarks

  • Gregg Mast, Executive Director, Clean Energy Economy Minnesota

The Minnesota Energy Factsheet is a companion to the 2021 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook, which has over 100 data visualizations of trends influencing national and state investment and economics, energy supply, and energy demand. Both resources are commissioned by the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE), with research by BloombergNEF.

Download this press release here.

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About Clean Energy Economy Minnesota (CEEM): CEEM is an industry-led 501(c)(3) nonprofit representing the business case for clean energy in Minnesota. CEEM provides a unified voice for clean energy business across the state. Our mission is to provide educational leadership, collaboration, and policy analysis that accelerates clean energy market growth and smart energy policies. Learn more at cleanenergyeconomymn.org.

About the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE): BCSE is a trade association representing the energy efficiency, natural gas, and renewable energy sectors. It advocates for policies at the state, federal, and international level that promote the deployment of the full portfolio of commercially available clean energy products, technologies and services. Learn more at bcse.org.

About BloombergNEF (BNEF): BNEF is a leading provider of primary research on clean energy, advanced transport, digital industry, innovative materials, and commodities.  With a team of experts spread across six continents, BNEF leverages the world’s most sophisticated data sets to create clear perspectives and in-depth forecasts that frame the financial, economic and policy implications of industry-transforming trends and technologies.  Available online, on mobile and on the Terminal, BNEF is powered by Bloomberg’s global network of 19,000 employees in 176 locations, reporting 5,000 news stories a day. Learn more at about.bnef.com.

Apply by April 30 to the 2021 Jan Schori Summer Fellowship Program

About the Jan Schori Summer Fellowship

The Business Council for Sustainable Energy seeks one fellow to assist with communications, event coordination and policy research.  Qualified candidates should have interest in the energy and environment fields and/or communications experience.

Jan Schori Summer Fellows work alongside the BCSE’s fulltime staff in the Council’s downtown Washington, DC offices.  The Fellowship runs approximately from the beginning of June to mid-August, depending on fellows’ academic schedules and on-going congressional activity.

  • First-hand observation of the work of leading government affairs professionals from businesses in the energy efficiency, natural gas and renewable energy sectors.
  • Knowledge of the operations and management of a trade association.
  • Experience using industry-standard communications and content management software.
  • Working with a small, collaborative and highly experienced team on expanding the clean energy sector.

Following their work with the BCSE, previous Jan Schori fellows have gone to work for the Office of Management and Budget, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Maryland State Energy Administration, the Texas Legislature, and various clean energy businesses and business organizations.

The Fellowship was established in 2008 to honor Jan Schori, former BCSE Board Chair and general manager and chief executive officer of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) upon her retirement.  Ms. Schori is currently of Counsel at Downy Brand in Sacramento, CA, and serves as an independent trustee on the North American Electric Reliability Council Board of Trustees and as a Board Member on the Climate Action Reserve.

Application Process

Please send a cover letter and résumé to [email protected].  The deadline for applications is April 30, 2021. Interviews for selected candidates will begin shortly thereafter and decisions made within a few weeks.

About the Council

The Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) is a coalition of companies and trade associations from the energy efficiency, natural gas and renewable energy sectors, and includes independent electric power producers, investor-owned utilities, public power, commercial end-users and environmental market service providers.  Founded in 1992, the Council advocates for policies at state, national and international levels that increases the use of commercially-available clean energy technologies, products and services.  The coalition’s diverse business membership is united around the revitalization of our economy and creation of a secure and sustainable energy future for America.

Worldwide, Advanced Energy Growth Overperforms in 2020

Since the industrial revolution, energy has been the engine of economic growth. With a new generation of energy technologies now reaching maturity, the advanced energy economy is taking over and fast. Since 2011, global advanced energy revenue has risen at a Compound Annual Growth Rate of 6%.

This data comes from our friends at Advanced Energy Economy (AEE), and its annual Advanced Energy Now 2021 Market Report that was released in late March. The report looks at the revenue growth from state-of-the-art technologies for building efficiency, electricity delivery and management, transportation, fuel production and delivery, industry, and electricity generation.

In 2020, a year in which all major economies were ground to a halt during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the total global revenue for advanced energy still topped $1.4 trillion, a 2.5% increase over the year prior.

AEE’s look at the power sector reports that both measures of the advanced electricity sector revenue, delivery and management and generation, grew 10%. Energy storage had the biggest revenue increase, up 139%. Other sectors with high growth were wind power, up 32% with record installations, and plug-in electric vehicles, up 19%.

In the United States, the American advanced energy economy[1] grew 8% in 2020, despite overall economic contraction. This adds to evidence from the 2021 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook that the energy transformation is on a resilient growth trajectory. U.S. advanced electricity generation revenues grew 10% in 2020, while worldwide revenues were flat, pointing to the maturity of the domestic market for clean energy.

Read the full report at https://info.aee.net/aen-2021-market-report.

[1] Excluding ethanol which saw decreased revenue due to lower travel.

BCSE Statement on President Biden’s American Jobs Plan (March 31, 2021)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 31, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

BCSE Statement on President Biden’s American Jobs Plan

Statement from Lisa Jacobson, BCSE President

“Clean energy is rightfully at the core of President Biden’s proposal for infrastructure legislation and economic recovery. Federal funding invested in clean energy today will pay dividends for years to come through new careers, a more resilient energy system, and reduced emissions. The President’s technology-inclusive proposal sets America up to use the most cost-effective clean energy solutions. The ambition of this policy package will send investment signals to American and international businesses to develop the next generation of sustainable technologies. BCSE looks forward to engaging with Congress to support bipartisan energy policy, including research, development and deployment funding and other areas detailed in our coalition’s recommendations for energy and climate change policy and our priorities for Congressional action.”

Download this press release.

State Energy Officials, Emergency Management Group, and Clean Energy Companies Call for DOE Coordination on Resilience

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 11, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

State Energy Officials, Emergency Management Group, and Clean Energy Companies Call for DOE Coordination on Resilience

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), the National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) and the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) sent a letter regarding resilience and disaster preparedness to Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm.

The letter requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinate with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other agencies to support energy system resilience investments, while providing technical assistance to states and tapping private sector expertise. Local resilience investments are enabled by the 2018 Disaster Recovery and Reform Act (DRRA) which created the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program. Up to six percent of funds used in congressional special disaster appropriations can be added to BRIC and distributed to states for resilience projects.

“The BRIC program funding is expected to reach between $500 million and $3 billion every year, depending on the severity of natural disasters,” said David Terry, Executive Director of NASEO. “Climate change is leading to more frequent and intense natural disasters, and states can target and leverage these federal funds with private sector resources for such priority resilience actions as strengthening the grid and other energy systems, upgrading energy efficiency and on-site power at mission critical facilities, ensuring equity is considered in these investments, and expanding training on building energy codes.  These actions will save lives and livelihoods, while reducing the long-term cost of taxpayer-funded reconstruction following disasters. A partnership among states, private energy companies, DOE, and FEMA aimed at knowledge-sharing and technical assistance would accelerate investment and enhance results.”

“Ensuring strong coordination between federal agencies and state and local partners to support increased energy resilience through the BRIC program is critical to preparing communities for extreme weather events and we look forward to the full integration of the expertise DOE can provide as part of the interagency efforts to support resilience on the ground in communities that need it,” said Trina Sheets, Executive Director of NEMA.

“Americas clean energy sectors have the technology and expertise to build resilient energy systems, which save lives during extreme weather events,” said Lisa Jacobson, President of BCSE. “The cold-weather crisis last month showed us that up-front resilience investment is urgently needed. We ask Secretary Granholm to support the effective and efficient use of BRIC program funding.”

Download the full letter here.

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About the Business Council for Sustainable Energy: BCSE is a coalition of companies and trade associations from the energy efficiency, natural gas and renewable energy sectors, and also includes investor-owned utilities, public power, independent power producers, project developers, equipment manufacturers, and environmental and energy market service providers. Established in 1992, the Council advocates for policies that expand the use of commercially-available clean energy technologies, products and services. For more information on the Council, please visit www.bcse.org. For the latest industry data, download the Sustainable Energy in America Factbook.

About the National Association of State Energy Officials: NASEO is the only national non-profit association for the governor-designated State Energy Directors and their offices from each of the 56 states, territories, and District of Columbia. Formed by the states in 1986, NASEO facilitates peer learning among state energy officials, serves as a resource for and about state energy offices, and advocates the interests of the state energy offices to Congress and federal agencies.  For more information about NASEO, please visit www.naseo.org.

About the National Emergency Management Association: Established in 1974, NEMA represents the emergency management directors of the 50 states, territories, and the District of Columbia. These professionals are responsible to their governors for all-hazards emergency preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery from all emergencies, disasters, and threats to the homeland. NEMA is a non-profit, non-partisan organization headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, and an affiliate of the Council of State Governments.

Evolving Commissioning Requirements in Building Efficiency

With the building sector estimated to generate nearly 40% of annual global greenhouse gas emissions, it’s no mystery that energy codes have risen up the agenda to meet the ambitious goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. But how do commissioning providers navigate and stay compliant with these evolving codes?

We asked our partners at the AABC Commissioning Group (ACG), the largest body of independent, certified commissioning professionals, for their input. This is a sneak peek of further information that will be provided in ACG’s upcoming CxEnergy 2021 Virtual webinar: “Evolving Commissioning Requirements in Building Energy Codes” by Scott West, PE, BCxP, LEED AP and Greg Schluterman, PE, CxA, LEED AP, HFA. 

Greg and Scott have contributed the following blog post to explore this issues.

This April, CxEnergy 2021 Virtual will deliver 16 live and pre-recorded technical presentations, covering case studies in commissioning and energy management in buildings and facilities, energy data analytics, critical updates to codes & standards, and more. Earn up to 16 CEUs/PDHs! Register today with promo code “BCSE10″ for a 10% discount.

Please note: This is independent advice from certified professionals in this sector and does not represent official technical, legal, or public health guidance from BCSE.

Evolving Commissioning Requirements in Building Energy Codes

The commissioning process has become familiar to most professionals in the building design and construction industry thanks to the popularity of beyond-code programs such as the LEED rating system1.  However, commissioning requirements have gradually been getting stronger in building energy codes and industry stakeholders need to be aware of how this impacts minimum code-compliant building projects.

The majority of building energy codes in the United States are based on either ASHRAE 90.12 or IECC3.  Each document is published on an asynchronous 3-year continuous maintenance cycle with numerous revisions being added for each publication.  This article explores the commissioning requirements in the energy codes since 2004 and how they’ve evolved to include robust commissioning programs over time.

The energy code started with test and balance requirements for HVAC air and hydronic distribution systems and compiling operations and maintenance manuals for installed equipment.  Since 2004, commissioning has emerged as a distinct function in guiding a project from design through to construction and operational handover.  With the increased emphasis on sensors and controls to provide higher levels of energy efficiency, functional performance testing has become a necessary result4,5.  Commissioning of building systems has a demonstrated track record in adding value to projects and helping to ensure systems perform as intended6,7.

Commissioning is particularly valuable when it evaluates systems that don’t come off-the-shelf in a nice, manufactured package.  Sometimes multiple construction trades and product manufacturers are involved in supplying and installing a single building system, and commissioning agents are the glue that can help ensure it functions when it’s time to perform.

Figure 1 shows a brief summary of how the commissioning technical requirements in the energy code have evolved from 2004 up to the present.  Figure 2 provides a similar summary of the commissioning documentation requirements.

Figure 1

Figure 2

As can be seen from the figures, commissioning requirements have been added piecemeal over the publication years and there are substantial differences between ASHRAE 90.1 and IECC.  Depending on the jurisdiction, adoption of the IECC typically allows ASHRAE 90.1 to be used as an alternative compliance path (according to the default IECC language).  Commissioning agents need to be attentive as the selected energy code compliance path is often chosen by the design team but has implications on the required commissioning scope.  Most projects end up on one compliance path or the other for reasons other than commissioning.  Different reasons include economizer requirements, envelope performance differences, window-to-wall ratio restrictions and whether a prescriptive or performance path is chosen.

Once a compliance path is chosen a commissioning agent usually has to get up to speed quickly in order to fulfill mandated technical and documentation requirements.  While the latest versions of ASHRAE 90.1 and IECC are approaching best practice commissioning scope, they are still short of beyond-code programs like LEED or the IgCC8.  Commissioning practitioners have to pay close attention to the energy code requirements in effect for a particular project and adjust their scope and fees accordingly.  Most commercial building owners want to get the most bang for their buck on commissioning and they want it done quickly and efficiently.

The differences in the commissioning requirements in the energy codes leave one to wonder what the core requirements of the commissioning process truly are.  The differences can make it challenging for a design team to know what exactly is required for their project.  Commissioning providers need to understand these differences and educate the owner and design team accordingly.  Being proactive on establishing the commissioning scope to be aligned with the code requirements will lead to a more successful project in the end.

References

  1. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), United States Green Building Council, https://www.usgbc.org/leed
  2. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2019, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings
  3. 2021 International Energy Conservation Code, International Code Council
  4. Are We Saving Energy from Code Controls Requirements in Real Buildings?, Energy Codes Webinar Series, 2017, Depart of Energy and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  5. Barriers to Energy Controls Delivering Real Savings, 2019; Hart, Reid; Rosenberg, Michael; ASHRAE Transactions, KC-19-A031
  6. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, 2009, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  7. Building Commissioning Costs and Savings Across Three Decades and 1,500 North American Buildings, 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  8. 2018 International Green Construction Code, International Code Council

Industry Coalition Calls on Congress to Recognize Clean Energy as Key Component to Revitalizing U.S. Infrastructure and Economy (March 11, 2021)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 11, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

Industry Coalition Calls on Congress to Recognize Clean Energy as Key Component to Revitalizing U.S. Infrastructure and Economy

Clean Energy Businesses Outline Priorities for Congress

The Business Council for Sustainable Energy released a letter today to Congressional leadership explaining the importance and opportunity for clean energy and demand-side energy efficiency to be a central focus of economic stimulus measures to improve our nation’s infrastructure. The letter outlined the following priority measures for Congress:

  • Enact robust funding for clean energy programs managed by federal agencies, including programs that leverage private sector capital.
  • Enact durable and long-term clean energy tax policy.
  • Provide workforce development support to make clean energy careers accessible to more Americans.
  • Provide support for advanced manufacturing to maintain U.S. leadership.

BCSE President Lisa Jacobson made the following statement:

“Clean energy must be recognized as a key component to any infrastructure legislation. America's energy system is inseparable from the rest of our country's infrastructure. National security, climate resilience and economic growth all depend on America’s energy system and the ongoing clean energy transformation.

“The crisis in Texas, Mississippi and other states that began with last month’s extreme cold weather showed that the resilience of the electricity and natural gas systems protect our transportation and water infrastructure and are critical to the health and safety of every household. States and cities are on the front lines of infrastructure planning and resilience, and the federal government has a critical role in supporting investments that will serve the whole country.

“The BCSE coalition advocates for federal funding to go towards initiatives that support new and existing research, development, demonstration and deployment efforts, and that leverage private sector capital. These recommendations are based on successful precedent and bipartisan values, we look forward to working with Congress on improving American infrastructure.”

Download the full letter here.

BCSE Statement on Introduction of the CLEAN Future Act (March 2, 2021)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 2, 2021

Contact: Julia Selker
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 541-908-5792

BCSE Statement on Introduction of the CLEAN Future Act

WASHINGTON D.C. – Today, Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ), Environment and Climate Change Subcommittee Chairman Paul Tonko (D-NY) and Energy Subcommittee Chairman Bobby L. Rush (D-IL) introduced the Climate Leadership and Environmental Action for Our Nation’s (CLEAN) Future Act. BCSE President Lisa Jacobson offered the following statement:

“Today’s introduction of the CLEAN Future Act is an important step forward for climate action in America. The bill shows that congressional leadership is working for a comprehensive approach to addressing climate change and investing in a more resilient economy. The inclusion of market-based programs and provisions that aim to focus on all sectors of the U.S. economy is important.  BCSE has long supported economy-wide approaches, as each sector has a role to play in reducing emissions and may require distinct emission reduction strategies.  BCSE looks forward to working with Congress on the legislation to ensure that the bill addresses the needs of the American energy system and is an effective set of policy tools to reduce emissions, improve resilience, as well as create durable investment signals and create jobs.”

BCSE’s recommendations for energy and climate change policy are available online at https://bcse.org/policy-recommendations-energy-climate-change/.

Download this press release.